BIOL
GR6002
GRAD CORE II
Semester: 
Fall 2018
Section Number: 
001
Days of the Week: 
Mondays
Wednesdays
Time: 
9:30am - 10:45am
Location: 
800 Fairchild
Number of Credits: 
2
Section Number: 
002
Days of the Week: 
Mondays
Wednesdays
Time: 
9:15am - 11:15am
Location: 
601 Fairchild
Number of Credits: 
2
Course Description: 

Section 001, Eukaryotic Gene:

This course presents a rigorous introduction to solution thermodynamics and applies it to understanding the structural and functional features of proteins. After exploring the conceptual origins of thermodynamic theory, the standard equations describing solution equilibria are derived and applied to analyzing biochemical reactions, with a focus on those involved in protein folding and allosteric communication. The semester culminates with exploration of the energetic factors controlling the formation of protein secondary structures and the role of entropy-enthalpy compensation in determining the complex temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions. The course emphasizes both qualitative understanding of the thermodynamic forces controlling the evolution and function of living organisms as well as practical application of thermodynamic methods and structural insight in laboratory research. Tutorials cover the use of curve-fitting techniques to analyze biochemical equilibria as well as the use of molecular visualization software to understand protein structure and function. This is a half semester, 2-point course.

Section 002,  Macromol Str Interaction:

This course presents a rigorous introduction to solution thermodynamics and applies it to understanding the structural and functional features of proteins. After exploring the conceptual origins of thermodynamic theory, the standard equations describing solution equilibria are derived and applied to analyzing biochemical reactions, with a focus on those involved in protein folding and allosteric communication. The semester culminates with exploration of the energetic factors controlling the formation of protein secondary structures and the role of entropy-enthalpy compensation in determining the complex temperature-dependent thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions. The course emphasizes both qualitative understanding of the thermodynamic forces controlling the evolution and function of living organisms as well as practical application of thermodynamic methods and structural insight in laboratory research. Tutorials cover the use of curve-fitting techniques to analyze biochemical equilibria as well as the use of molecular visualization software to understand protein structure and function. This is a half semester, 2-point course.

 

Business Office

Department of Biological Sciences
500 Fairchild Center
Mail Code 2401
Columbia University
1212 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10027

Academic Office

Department of Biological Sciences
600 Fairchild Center
Mail Code 2402
Columbia University
1212 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10027
[email protected]
212 854-4581